The Legalization of Marijuana in Texas

Most Texans would like to see marijuana legalized in some way, according to our 2017 post-election survey. In our poll of registered Texas voters, the majority of respondents indicated that they wanted to see marijuana legalized in general or see marijuana legalized for medical use.

Should Texas Legalize Marijuana?

Do you think Texas should legalize medical marijuana, legalize marijuana in general, should not legalize marijuana at all, or you need more information?

Legalize medical marijuana 25%

Legalize marijuana in general 43%

Should not legalize marijuana at all 21%

Needs more information 8%

Don’t Know 2%

Refuse <1%

Forty-three percent of Texas voters want to see marijuana legalized in general, while 25% would like to legalize medical marijuana. This means that 68% would like to see it legalized in some way. Only 21% of Texas voters believes that it should not be legalized at all, and 8% of the respondents need more information on the subject before making a decision either way.

Party ID & Marijuana Legalization

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Legalize medical marijuana

28%

29% 21%

18%

Legalize marijuana in general

26%

47% 53%

62%

Should not legalize marijuana at all

38%

19% 8%

11%

Needs more information

6%

3% 15%

4%

When compared to party identification, only Republicans believe that marijuana should not be legalized in Texas (38%). The majority of Democrats (47%), Independents (53%), and voters who identify with a different political party (62%) think that marijuana should be legalized in general.

______________________________________________________________

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

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Posted in Policy, Texas Politics

Texas Governor Approval Rating

In our recent post-election survey, we found that Texas Governor Greg Abbott has a strong favorability rating, particularly among Republicans and Texas voters who are not attached to the two main political parties.

Approval Rating for Texas Governor Greg Abbott

Do you approve or disapprove of the way Greg Abbott is handling his job as Governor of Texas?

Approve 54%

Disapprove 30%

Don’t Know 15%

Refuse 1%

According to our results, 54% of Texas registered voters approve of how Greg Abbott is handling his job as governor and 30% disapprove. Fifteen percent are undecided on the issue.

Party ID & Approval Rating for Texas Governor Greg Abbott

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Approve

87%

36% 31%

52%

Disapprove

3%

46% 47%

36%

Don’t Know

10%

17% 21%

11%

Refuse

<1%

2% 2%

1%

Governor Abbott enjoys an 87% approval rating among Republicans and a 52% approval rating among respondents who do not consider themselves a Republican, Democrat, or an Independent. Most Democrats (46%) and Independents (47%) disapprove of the way Greg Abbott is handling his job as governor of Texas.

______________________________________________________________

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Approval Ratings, Texas Politics

Same-Sex Marriage in Texas

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students administered a post-election survey to Texas voters. Respondents were asked two questions about same-sex marriage in Texas. The first question asked voters whether same-sex marriage should be recognized by the law as valid. The second question asked respondents whether same-sex married couples are entitled to the legal benefits of marriage.

Same Sex Marriage Recognized by the Law in Texas

Do you think marriages between gay and lesbian couples should or should not be recognized by the law as valid?

Should be recognized as valid 64%

Should NOT be recognized as valid 28%

Don’t Know 4%

Refuse 3%

According to the results, 64% of Texas voters believe that marriage between same-sex couples should be recognized by the law as valid. Twenty-eight percent of Texas voters believe that same-sex couples should not be recognized by the law as valid.

Marriage Benefits for Same-Sex Couples in Texas

The Texas Supreme Court will soon hear a case regarding whether same-sex married couples are entitled to the legal benefits of marriage (such as insurance coverage for a spouse). Do you think same-sex married couples are entitled to the full benefits of marriage?

Yes, they are entitled to the full benefits 68%

No, they are NOT entitled to the full benefits 27%

Don’t Know 3%

Refuse 1%

Most Texas voters (68%) think that same-sex married couples are entitled to the legal benefits of marriage, while 28% think that same-sex married couples are not entitled.

Party ID & Same-Sex Marriage Recognized by the Law in Texas

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Valid

35%

75% 82%

76%

Not Valid

52%

16% 15%

20%

Don’t Know

7%

6% 1%

2%

Refuse

7%

3% 1%

2%

 

When compared to party identification, the majority of Democrats (75%), Independents (82%), and respondents who identify with a different political party (76%) think that same-sex marriage should be recognized by the law as valid. The majority of Republicans (52%) think that same-sex marriage should not be recognized by the law as valid.

Party ID & Marriage Benefits for Same-Sex Couples in Texas

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Are entitled to full benefits

37%

86% 85%

79%

Are not entitled to full benefits

55%

11% 12%

20%

Don’t Know

5%

2% 3%

Refuse

3%

<1%

1%

 

When compared to party identification, the majority of Democrats (86%), Independents (85%), and respondents who identify with a different political party (79%) think that same-sex married couples are entitled to the legal benefits of marriage. Most Republicans (55%) think that same-sex married couples are not entitled to the legal benefits of marriage.

______________________________________________________________

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Same-Sex Marriage, Texas Politics

Transgender Bathrooms in Texas

During the Spring 2017 semester, the ESRL released its post-election survey results. ESRL employees and undergraduate students polled registered voters in the state of Texas. Respondents were asked one question about the transgender bathroom issue.

Results of the Transgender Bathroom Question

If you had to choose, which comes closest to your view? Transgender people should be:

Allowed to use the public restrooms of the gender with which they currently identify 37%

Required to use the public restrooms of the gender they were born into 49%

Don’t Know 10%

Refuse 4%

Most respondents (49%) think that transgender people should be required to use the public restrooms of the gender they were born into. However, 37% of Texans think that transgender people should be allowed to use the public restrooms of the gender with which they currently identify. Ten percent of the respondents are unsure and 4% of the respondents refused to answer the question.

Party ID Compared to Transgender Bathrooms in Texas

Republican Democrat Independent

Something Else

Allowed

11%

55% 49%

38%

Gender born into

80%

30% 31%

51%

Don’t Know

6%

8% 15%

8%

Refuse

3%

7% 4%

3%

When compared to party identification, 80% of the respondents who consider themselves to be a Republican think that transgender people should be required to use the public restrooms of the gender they were born into. The majority of Democrats (55%) and Independents (49%) think that transgender people should be allowed to use the public restrooms of the gender with which they currently identify. Most Texans (51%) who identify with a different political party also think that transgender people should be required to use the public restrooms of the gender they were born into.

______________________________________________________________

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Texas Politics, Transgender Bathrooms

International Concerns of Texas Voters on Russia and Cyber Attacks

During the Spring 2017 semester, the ESRL surveyed Texas registered voters about international concerns. First, tensions with Russia. Second, cyberattacks from other countries.

Russia and Cyber-Attacks against the United States

The ESRL asked the following question.

I would like your opinion about some possible international concerns for the U.S. Please rate the concerns as a major threat, minor threat, or not a threat.

Tensions with Russia: Cyberattacks from other countries:
Major Threat 48% Major Threat 73%
Minor Threat 39% Minor Threat 20%
Not a Threat 9% Not a Threat 5%
Don’t Know 3% Don’t Know 2%
Refuse <1% Refuse <1%

Eighty-seven percent of the respondents believe tensions with Russia are a threat, with 48% of Texas voters believing these a major threat and 39% believing these a minor threat. Nine percent of the respondents view tensions with Russia as not a threat to the U.S.

Ninety-three percent of the respondents believe cyberattacks against the U.S. are a threat, with 73% of Texas voters believing these a major threat and 20% believing these a minor threat. Five percent of the respondents view cyberattacks against the U.S. as not a threat.

Party ID Compared to Tensions with Russia

Republican Democrat Independent Something Else
Major Threat 33% 62% 60% 37%
Minor Threat 52% 26% 31% 49%
Not a Threat 11% 6% 8% 13%
Don’t Know 4% 7% 2%
Refuse 1%

Most Republicans in Texas feel that tensions with Russia are only a minor threat (52%), while the majority of Democrats (62%) and Independents (60%) believe that tensions are a major threat.

Party ID Compared to Cyberattacks against the U.S.

Republican Democrat Independent Something Else
Major Threat 71% 74% 79% 63%
Minor Threat 20% 20% 17% 25%
Not a Threat 5% 3% 5% 9%
Don’t Know 3% 3% 2%
Refuse 1% 0%

 Cyberattacks against the U.S. are viewed as a major threat across all political parties in the state of Texas.

______________________________________________________________

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Russia, U.S. Politics

Views of Federal Health Care Coverage in the State of Texas

In the most recent survey by the ESRL, registered Texas voters were asked questions regarding federal health care coverage. The first question asked Texas citizens whether it was the responsibility of the federal government to provide health coverage to all Americans and the responses were almost equally divided. They were asked a follow-up question depending how they answered.

Federal Government Responsibility of Health Care Coverage

Do you think it is the responsibility of the federal government to make sure all Americans have health care coverage, or is that not the responsibility of the federal government?

Yes, government is responsible 45%

No, government is not responsible 48%

Don’t Know 5%

Refuse 1%

 

If the citizens of Texas believe the federal government is responsible for health care coverage, they were asked a following question about federal health insurance. Sixty percent of those respondents think health insurance should be provided through a single national health insurance system run by the government, and 35% think health insurance should continue to be provided through a mix of private insurance companies and government programs.

If respondents do not think the federal government is responsible for health care coverage, they were then asked a question about the federal government. Amongst those respondents, 68% think the government should continue programs like Medicare and Medicaid for seniors and the very poor. Thirty-two percent indicated that the government should not be involved in providing health insurance at all.

Federal Government Responsibility of Health Care Coverage

and Party Identification

When comparing if it is the responsibility of the federal government to make sure all Americans have health care coverage and party identification, 80% of Republicans do not think it is the government’s responsibility. On the contrary, most Democrats (75%) and Independents (58%) believe that it is. Texas voters who identify with a different party identification are somewhat divided on the issue.

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Yes

15%

75% 58%

47%

No

80%

16% 37%

52%

Don’t Know

5%

7% 4%

1%

Refuse

1%

2% 1%

0%

 

______________________________________________________________

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Health Care, U.S. Politics

Sex Education in Texas Public Schools

The ESRL recently completed its post-election survey. Respondents were asked two questions about sex education in public schools. The first question for respondents was to assess their awareness of what is currently being taught in Texas and the second question asked whether there was a need for a more comprehensive approach.

Awareness of Sex Education in Public Schools

Are you aware that most Texas school districts teach abstinence-only sex education or no sex education?

Yes, I am aware 54%

No, I am NOT aware 44%

Don’t Know 1%

Refuse <1%

Of the 442 respondents, most (54%) were aware that Texas school districts teach abstinence-only sex education or no sex-education at all.

Support for a More Comprehensive Approach

Do you support abstinence-only sex education or would you prefer that Texas school districts adopt a more comprehensive approach?

Abstinence-only sex education 14%

Adopt a more comprehensive approach 77%

Don’t Know 8%

Refuse 1%

 

An overwhelming majority (77%) of registered Texas voters would prefer that school districts adopt a more comprehensive approach.

Support for a More Comprehensive Approach and Party Identification

When compared to party identification, the majority of all political parties support a more comprehensive approach.

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Abstinence-only 26% 5% 11% 7%
More Comprehensive 63% 81% 86% 83%
Don’t Know 9% 13% 3% 10%
Refuse 2% 2%

______________________________________________________________

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Public Education, Texas Politics | Tagged