International Concerns of Texas Voters on Russia and Cyber Attacks

During the Spring 2017 semester, the ESRL surveyed Texas registered voters about international concerns. First, tensions with Russia. Second, cyberattacks from other countries.

Russia and Cyber-Attacks against the United States

The ESRL asked the following question.

I would like your opinion about some possible international concerns for the U.S. Please rate the concerns as a major threat, minor threat, or not a threat.

Tensions with Russia: Cyberattacks from other countries:
Major Threat 48% Major Threat 73%
Minor Threat 39% Minor Threat 20%
Not a Threat 9% Not a Threat 5%
Don’t Know 3% Don’t Know 2%
Refuse <1% Refuse <1%

Eighty-seven percent of the respondents believe tensions with Russia are a threat, with 48% of Texas voters believing these a major threat and 39% believing these a minor threat. Nine percent of the respondents view tensions with Russia as not a threat to the U.S.

Ninety-three percent of the respondents believe cyberattacks against the U.S. are a threat, with 73% of Texas voters believing these a major threat and 20% believing these a minor threat. Five percent of the respondents view cyberattacks against the U.S. as not a threat.

Party ID Compared to Tensions with Russia

Republican Democrat Independent Something Else
Major Threat 33% 62% 60% 37%
Minor Threat 52% 26% 31% 49%
Not a Threat 11% 6% 8% 13%
Don’t Know 4% 7% 2%
Refuse 1%

Most Republicans in Texas feel that tensions with Russia are only a minor threat (52%), while the majority of Democrats (62%) and Independents (60%) believe that tensions are a major threat.

Party ID Compared to Cyberattacks against the U.S.

Republican Democrat Independent Something Else
Major Threat 71% 74% 79% 63%
Minor Threat 20% 20% 17% 25%
Not a Threat 5% 3% 5% 9%
Don’t Know 3% 3% 2%
Refuse 1% 0%

 Cyberattacks against the U.S. are viewed as a major threat across all political parties in the state of Texas.

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From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Russia, U.S. Politics

Views of Federal Health Care Coverage in the State of Texas

In the most recent survey by the ESRL, registered Texas voters were asked questions regarding federal health care coverage. The first question asked Texas citizens whether it was the responsibility of the federal government to provide health coverage to all Americans and the responses were almost equally divided. They were asked a follow-up question depending how they answered.

Federal Government Responsibility of Health Care Coverage

Do you think it is the responsibility of the federal government to make sure all Americans have health care coverage, or is that not the responsibility of the federal government?

Yes, government is responsible 45%

No, government is not responsible 48%

Don’t Know 5%

Refuse 1%

 

If the citizens of Texas believe the federal government is responsible for health care coverage, they were asked a following question about federal health insurance. Sixty percent of those respondents think health insurance should be provided through a single national health insurance system run by the government, and 35% think health insurance should continue to be provided through a mix of private insurance companies and government programs.

If respondents do not think the federal government is responsible for health care coverage, they were then asked a question about the federal government. Amongst those respondents, 68% think the government should continue programs like Medicare and Medicaid for seniors and the very poor. Thirty-two percent indicated that the government should not be involved in providing health insurance at all.

Federal Government Responsibility of Health Care Coverage

and Party Identification

When comparing if it is the responsibility of the federal government to make sure all Americans have health care coverage and party identification, 80% of Republicans do not think it is the government’s responsibility. On the contrary, most Democrats (75%) and Independents (58%) believe that it is. Texas voters who identify with a different party identification are somewhat divided on the issue.

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Yes

15%

75% 58%

47%

No

80%

16% 37%

52%

Don’t Know

5%

7% 4%

1%

Refuse

1%

2% 1%

0%

 

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From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Health Care, U.S. Politics

Sex Education in Texas Public Schools

The ESRL recently completed its post-election survey. Respondents were asked two questions about sex education in public schools. The first question for respondents was to assess their awareness of what is currently being taught in Texas and the second question asked whether there was a need for a more comprehensive approach.

Awareness of Sex Education in Public Schools

Are you aware that most Texas school districts teach abstinence-only sex education or no sex education?

Yes, I am aware 54%

No, I am NOT aware 44%

Don’t Know 1%

Refuse <1%

Of the 442 respondents, most (54%) were aware that Texas school districts teach abstinence-only sex education or no sex-education at all.

Support for a More Comprehensive Approach

Do you support abstinence-only sex education or would you prefer that Texas school districts adopt a more comprehensive approach?

Abstinence-only sex education 14%

Adopt a more comprehensive approach 77%

Don’t Know 8%

Refuse 1%

 

An overwhelming majority (77%) of registered Texas voters would prefer that school districts adopt a more comprehensive approach.

Support for a More Comprehensive Approach and Party Identification

When compared to party identification, the majority of all political parties support a more comprehensive approach.

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Abstinence-only 26% 5% 11% 7%
More Comprehensive 63% 81% 86% 83%
Don’t Know 9% 13% 3% 10%
Refuse 2% 2%

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From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline (28%) and cell phones (72%). The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center

The codebook can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey.

Posted in Public Education, Texas Politics | Tagged

Texas 2017 Post-Election Survey

From March 20 to April 13, 2017, ESRL employees and undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman.

The employees and students called registered voters in the state of Texas and had 442 completed surveys. Interviews were administered on both landline and cell phones. The margin of error was ±4.6 at the 95% confidence interval. The sample was weighted based on age from the 2015 population estimate obtained from the Texas Demographic Center.

President Donald Trump’s Approval Rating

Do you approve or disapprove of the way Donald Trump is handling his job as President of the United States?

Approve 43%

Disapprove 49%

Don’t Know 6%

Refuse 1%

President Donald Trump’s Approval Rating and Party Identification

Republican

Democrat Independent

Something Else

Approve

65%

2% 15%

16%

Disapprove

5%

36% 40%

15%

Don’t Know

36%

12% 47%

5%

Refuse

13%

9% 31%

47%

Sixty-five percent of Texas voters that identify as a Republican approve of how President Trump is handling his job as President, but 36% are undecided.

Many Texas voters that identify as a Democrat (36%) disapprove of how President Trump is handling his job as President.

Most Texas voters that identify as an Independent are undecided (47%) how President Trump is handling his job as President. In addition, 40% disapprove and 31% refused to answer.

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The survey questionnaire can be found here: ESRL Spring 2017 Survey

Posted in Approval Ratings, U.S. Politics

Donald Trump’s Immigration Policies

According to our 2016 Election Survey, a majority of Texans (50%, 260 respondent votes) will cast their presidential vote for Republican nominee Donald Trump (Graph 1). Hillary Clinton, the Democratic candidate, follows with 34% support. Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson has 5% support for president, while Green Party nominee Jill Stein has only 2% support.

Graph 1: Presidential Candidate Support in Texas

candidate-support

Although our results show strong support for Trump, respondents do not seem to support his immigration policies. Graph 2 shows the results of Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban Muslims from entering the United States, and Graph 3 illustrates the results of his policy to build a wall between the United States and Mexico. As you can see, Texas is very much divided on these issues even though they strongly support Donald Trump.

Graph 2: Donald Trump’s Temporary Ban on Muslims

trump-muslims

Graph 3: Donald Trump’s Wall Proposal

trump-wall

There is an explanation for this. Party loyalty. Texas has historically been a red state since 1980 and supports conservative principals. But how conservative? Take a look at the graphs below. Our survey asked respondents whether they identified themselves as Republican (37%), Democrat (23%), Independent (27%), or Something Else (11%). For those that identified as a Republican, 25% of the respondents said that they are a “not so strong Republican” (Graph 4).

Graph 4: Party Identification in Texas

party-id

Graph 5: Strong or Not So Strong Republican

strong-republican

What does all of this look like together, you might ask? The cross-tabulation below shows the frequencies comparing presidential candidate support and Trump’s policy proposals for immigration. Initially, Trump had 260 respondent votes and according to this, 64 respondents do not support his proposal to temporarily ban Muslims from entering the United States (Table 1).

Table 1: Cross-Tabulation of Presidential Candidate Support and

Donald Trump’s Temporary Ban on Muslims

Do you support Donald Trump’s policy to temporarily ban Muslims from entering the United States? Yes No Don’t Know Refuse
Hillary Clinton 18 153 2 1
Donald Trump 196 37 21 6
Gary Johnson 13 13 0 0
Jill Stein 5 6 1 0
Some other candidate 3 7 2 0
Don’t Know 8 14 5 0
Refuse 0 6 0 1

As for Trump’s plan to build a wall, he has a little more support with 211 respondents. Not much, but a little more (Table 2).

Table 2: Cross-Tabulation of Presidential Candidate Support and

Donald Trump’s Wall Proposal

Do you support Donald Trump’s policy to build a wall between the United States and Mexico? Yes No Don’t Know Refuse
Hillary Clinton 12 162 0 0
Donald Trump 211 34 14 1
Gary Johnson 8 17 0 0
Jill Stein 3 8 1 0
Some other candidate 3 6 3 0
Don’t Know 8 18 1 0
Refuse 2 4 0 1

How conservative are Trump’s immigration policy proposals? Very conservative, to say the least. A reason that people support Trump and not necessarily his policy issues is due to party loyalty. Most people identify with the Republican or Democratic Party and vote accordingly, regardless of nominee’s policy proposals. Party identification is the best predictor of how people will vote and I think our results show that.

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The margin of error is ± 4.2 at the 95% confidence level. The survey questionnaire can be found here: codebook-final.

The Earl Survey Research Lab (ESRL) at Texas Tech University administered a survey to registered voters in the state of Texas from October 11 to November 3, 2016. Undergraduate students conducted interviews as part of a class project who were enrolled in Political Analysis and Environmental Law, taught by Dr. Jared Perkins, and Introduction to American Government, taught by Dr. Sara Norman. ESRL interviewers conducted surveys as well.

 

Posted in Immigration, U.S. Politics